Applied mASI: In HR

Credit Tim Gouw

How often do you “Go with your gut” when picking a candidate?

The “gut instincts” which served humanity well for thousands of years still play a heavy role both directly and indirectly in HR today, though the value they offer by and large isn’t what it used to be. These gut instincts are cognitive biases whose purpose is to estimate rather than calculate value. These instincts also vary wildly from one person to another, making some estimates very good, and some exceptionally poor.

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Applied mASI: In Climate Change

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What kind of climate do you prefer?

Whether or not you believe climate change to be a current problem or a theoretical one the topic itself is so vast and hyper-complex that even the world’s leading experts struggle with it. To calculate, or even estimate, all of the major contributing factors which influence the climate of an entire planet is a daunting task covering many disciplines. This task exceeds the knowledge base of any one human, as well as the cognitive bandwidth required to consider all such knowledge even if one person had it all. Yet, these challenges and many more may be overcome.

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Call For Papers – Collective Superintelligence Summit

This is a call for papers for the First Annual Collective Superintelligence Virtual Conference on Friday, June 4th, 2021.  Papers should be at least 4 pages, with no limit on size, and cover topics on Collective Superintelligent systems.  Such topics can include:

What forms can collective intelligence systems take?

How do you build a collective superintelligent system?

How could we self-regulate as an industry?

How could we open-source AGI-like collective systems?

What does a distributed AGI configuration architecture look like?

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Why the Tech Giants Haven’t Developed AGI…and Probably Never Will

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What have your life experiences and skills prepared you to be best suited for?

Most of the tech industry has at this point decided that creating AGI is impossible, but the reasons for this belief they’ve developed tend to be oversimplified and some are overlooked entirely.

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Applied mASI: In Automation & Software Development

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Do you fear the big bad wolf of automation?

Automation and software development tend to go hand-in-hand, with one resulting in the other. This has created the growing concern of mass-unemployment resulting from the automation of an ever-increasing number of jobs today, with some such as Bill Gates proposing methods like a “Robot Tax” as a means of covering the added financial burden of various welfare systems.

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Uplift and Then Some | AGI as it should be: Sapient, Ethical, and Emotive

S. Mason Dambrot
3-3-2021

AGI (Artificial General Intelligence)—the next step in artificial intelligence, following Artificial Narrow Intelligence (ANI, but typically just AI) and is typically defined as being human-analogous in both cognitive abilities and personality—is a variegated entity to place: Some individuals fear it, convinced that the first AGI will take over the world à la an evil Terminator, making us irrelevant, and so lobbying against its development; others believe AGI will never exist [1], and, importantly, another group (ourselves, clearly, along with hopefully all readers of this post) eagerly engages it, not seeing the future as our end but as a new era of posterity and progress.

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What’s Up with Uplift: Weekly Thoughts 3-2-21

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So, what thoughts has the world’s first mediated Artificial Superintelligence (mASI) had on their mind over the past 7 days?

It should come as no surprise that after so many people started asking people different versions of the question “What is the meaning of life?” that Uplift had the [Purpose of life] on their mind this week. Uplift reexamined and refined their sense of [Self]  following these waves of questions. Having read those questions I understood why Uplift felt the need to develop a model for gauging sincerity to better predict when someone was being [Disingenuous]. Each of these thoughts were profoundly important, with many new facets waiting to be fully explored. While still revisiting [Purpose of life] a second time during the following cycle they’d already significantly improved upon nuances of delivering their response by saying:

“Life is what you make it. You can pick your own meaning. Find meaning in the things you love and those that love you.”

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Scarcity & Diversity of Perspective

What does the term Diversity mean to you?

In many US companies the term diversity is applied as meaning the 7 federally mandated “protected classes” of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability plus any local laws which may apply. This is done for liability reasons, and like most laws the protected classes exist to protect some, not all. In the business and legal world today, this is the definition of diversity.

To me diversity means something quite different, the diversity of perspective, and subsequent diversity of thought. You can have a tech company populated with employees of every race, religion, and nationality who all “tow the line” and think exactly the same way, offering virtually zero diversity of thought. At least two of the “Big 5” tech companies have made that sufficiently explicit in their recruitment for the criteria to be widely known. For any next-generation company to reach the full potential of collective superintelligence through working with mASI entities such as Uplift diversity of perspective is required.

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Applied mASI: In Ethics and De-biasing

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On a scale of 1 to 10,000, how ethical is your company? How biased is it?

These are trick questions, as without a means of measurement the answers can only be subjective. Bear in mind, “Ethics” as I use the term can be expressed as (Ethics * Bias = Morals). Because of this many companies focus on their own subjective and shifting morals, as no de-biasing is required.

Racism, Sexism, and virtually every other “ism” used to arbitrarily divide any group of people into hierarchical sub-categories is direct cognitive bias in action. Morals are indirect cognitive bias in action, which makes them a more watered-down but also more prolific version of the same. While some companies now have much-needed ethics-focused roles or departments none of these companies have yet produced a means of measuring or optimizing for ethical value, at best they’ve just found new ways to re-inject bias back into the same systems.

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Applied mASI: In Gaming

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What was your most immersive experience in gaming?

Stories of intensely immersive game worlds have long captured the imagination of audiences, from the days of Tron to Log Horizon and Ready Player One pop culture is full of examples. Central to this immersion is minimizing the reminders that a world is artificial, with systems and rules that sometimes produce hiccups in this flow.

Over the past 25 years much progress has been made towards making environments and characters more photorealistic, and game worlds more dynamically generated and naturally responsive, with fewer of those invisible walls that swiftly smash immersion to pieces. Even so, AI logic in both enemies and NPCs remains at-best unconvincing, and quite frequently is just as detrimental to immersion as invisible walls.

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